Past Motions

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Motions that have been voted on by the Board of Directors in the past month will be posted to this page by approximately the last day of each month. Feedback on any motion should be directed to executive.secretary@asca.org for distribution to the Board..

As rule changes are approved, the Executive Secretary will make those changes to the rulebooks posted on the website, with the effective date noted, in order for the membership to see what changes will be in effect in the upcoming competitive season.

Please refer to past Secretary’s Reports for information on motions older than 30 days.

 

BOD Motion Results - BD.23.01 Forego Section 8.13 of Policy Book for 2023 Spring Meeting

Members,

The voting results for this motion have been finalized. Please find them included in this email.

Thank you for your involvement with ASCA.

Sincerely,
Kalla Jaco
ASCA Executive Secretary

BD.23.01 Forego Section 8.13 of Policy Book for 2023 Spring Meeting

Motion carried (8-0) – Approved: Busquets, Byrne, Creelman, Gann, Gerken, Larson, McCabe, Wesen. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-voting: Sims.

Motion by Byrne to forgo Section 8.13 of the ASCA Policy Book in regard to travel reimbursement/per diem/lodging reimbursement for all directors attending in person the Spring 2023 Board of Directors meeting to be held March 30-April 1, 2023, in Bryan/College Station, Texas. Second by Sims.

Comments/Rationale: The approval of this motion will provide a significant cost-saving measure to ASCA during this time of financial strife.

Affected: All ASCA Board of Directors members. ASCA Business Office Manager.

Effective Date: Immediately upon Board approval.

Kalla Jaco

Executive Secretary, Australian Shepherd Club of America

asca.execsec@gmail.com

6091 E. State Hwy 21, Bryan, TX 77808 | (979) 778-1082

Check us out on our Website, Facebook, and YouTube Channel

No Current Motions

BOD Motion Results - AG.23.01 Calling Points for the First Gamble Obstacle

Members,

The voting results for this motion have been finalized. Please find them included in this email.

Thank you for your involvement with ASCA.

Sincerely,
Kalla Jaco
ASCA Executive Secretary

AG.23.01 Calling Points for the First Gamble Obstacle

Motion carried (9-0) – Approved: Busquets, Byrne, Creelman, Gann, Gerken, Larson, McCabe, Sims, Wesen. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-voting: None.

Motion by Liaison Byrne to approve the following recommendation from the Agility Committee.

Committee Recommendation: Calling Points for the First Gamble Obstacle

Motion by Sherry Butler to approve calling the point value (“zero” or “two”) for the first gamble obstacle if the dog is on or in that obstacle when the whistle or horn sounds. Seconded by Jan Niblock.

Results of Committee Vote: Approved: 10.  Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-Voting: 1.

Current Wording:

7.2.2 Scoring

At the end of the point accumulation period, a whistle or horn will sound, indicating that the gamble time has begun. The handler must maneuver their dog into the gamble area to perform the gamble. The gamble begins when the dog performs the first gamble obstacle in the correct direction as defined by Section 9.2.1. EXAMPLE: if the first obstacle is the A-frame or teeter and the dog gets on the obstacle with all four paws on the ascent side and then comes off without touching the contact zone on the descent side with at least one paw, zero points will be awarded, and the gamble is over. The dog must perform the gamble obstacles in the exact order described in the judge’s course design. If the signal (horn, buzzer, or whistle) indicating the gamble time has ended SOUNDS before the dog completes the last gamble obstacle, the gamble is not completed. The Judge shall award points to the last COMPLETED obstacle. EXAMPLE: if a horn sounds as dog is over the #8 jump, the Judge shall award 2-4-6. Signal must not SOUND for dog to be awarded the obstacle.

Proposed Wording:

7.2.2 Scoring

At the end of the point accumulation period, a whistle or horn will sound, indicating that the gamble time has begun. The handler must maneuver their dog into the gamble area to perform the gamble. The gamble begins when the dog performs the first gamble obstacle in the correct direction as defined by Section 9.2.1. EXAMPLE: if the first obstacle is the A-frame or teeter and the dog gets on the obstacle with all four paws on the ascent side and then comes off without touching the contact zone on the descent side with at least one paw, zero points will be awarded, and the gamble is over. If the dog is on or in the first gamble obstacle when the whistle or horn sounds, the judge will call “zero” if the dog did not complete the obstacle to earn opening points or will call “two” if the dog successfully completed the obstacle in the gamble sequence during the gamble time. The dog must perform the gamble obstacles in the exact order described in the judge’s course design. If the signal (horn, buzzer, or whistle) indicating the gamble time has ended SOUNDS before the dog completes the last gamble obstacle, the gamble is not completed. The Judge shall award points to the last COMPLETED obstacle. EXAMPLE: if a horn sounds as dog is over the #8 jump, the Judge shall award 2-4-6. Signal must not SOUND for dog to be awarded the obstacle.

Comments/Rationale: If the gamble whistle or horn sounds when the dog is working or close to working the first obstacle in the gamble, it is sometimes hard for the handler to know if the obstacle will count toward the gamble or if they need to direct the dog to take the obstacle again for it to count for the gamble. If the judge calls a “zero”, the handler will know they need to do the obstacle again for the gamble. If the judge calls a “two”, the handler will know the first gamble obstacle is complete and they need to go on to the second gamble obstacle.

Affected: Judges and Competitors.

Effective Date: June 1, 2023.

Kalla Jaco

Executive Secretary, Australian Shepherd Club of America

asca.execsec@gmail.com

6091 E. State Hwy 21, Bryan, TX 77808 | (979) 778-1082

Check us out on our Website, Facebook, and YouTube Channel

BOD Motion Results - AG.23.02 Standardize Gamble Obstacle Labels and Numbering

Members,

The voting results for this motion have been finalized. Please find them included in this email.

Thank you for your involvement with ASCA.

Sincerely,
Kalla Jaco
ASCA Executive Secretary

AG.23.02 Standardize Gamble Obstacle Labels and Numbering

Motion carried (8-0) – Approved: Busquets, Byrne, Creelman, Gann, Gerken, Larson, McCabe, Wesen. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-voting: Sims.

Motion by Liaison Byrne to approve the following recommendation from the Agility Committee.

Committee Recommendation: Standardize Gamble Obstacle Labels and Numbering

Motion by Sherry Butler to approve the standardization of how the gamble obstacles are labeled on course maps and numbered on the course. Seconded by Sandra Katzen.

Results of Committee Vote: Approved: 8. Disapproved: 2. Abstained: None. Non-Voting: 1.

Current Wording:

7.4.2 The Gamble Course Design

The gamble itself will be spaced as if it were part of a regular course, meeting Regular course design spacing guidelines (18′- 21′ between obstacles), and with flow.

In the closing gamble sequence, the dog will perform a numbered set of obstacles to be done in a set time assigned by the judge. The ‘gamble closing sequence’ consists of four obstacles to be performed in numbered order. All the required tests must be somewhere between these four obstacles, not including any bonus obstacles.

7.4.3 Bonus Obstacles

A gamble closing sequence may consist of more than four obstacles. The judge shall calculate the ‘closing gamble sequence’ time based on the performance of the first four obstacles (1-2, 2-3, 3-4) in the gamble closing sequence. There shall be no additional time added for the performance of any ‘bonus’ obstacle. If a ‘bonus’ obstacle is used, the finish line will be placed directly after the ‘bonus’ obstacle and the dog will only be required to successfully complete the first four obstacles in the gamble before the second whistle/horn is sounded to denote the end of the allowed gamble time. The handler shall guide the dog to perform the ‘bonus’ obstacle to stop the dog’s course time. If the ‘bonus’ obstacle is not performed to stop the clock, then the dog’s time will stop when the handler places the leash on the dog.

Proposed Wording:

7.4.2 The Gamble Course Design

The gamble itself will be spaced as if it were part of a regular course, meeting Regular course design spacing guidelines (18′- 21′ between obstacles), and with flow.

In the closing gamble sequence, the dog will perform a numbered set of obstacles to be done in a set time assigned by the judge. The ‘gamble closing sequence’ consists of four obstacles to be performed in numbered order. The obstacles will be numbered 1, 2, 3, 4 on the course map and on the course. All the required tests must be somewhere between these four obstacles, not including any bonus obstacles.

7.4.3 Bonus Obstacles

A gamble closing sequence may consist of more than four obstacles. Bonus obstacles will be numbered 5, 6, etc. on the course map and on the course. The judge shall calculate the ‘closing gamble sequence’ time based on the performance of the first four obstacles (1-2, 2-3, 3-4) in the gamble closing sequence. There shall be no additional time added for the performance of any ‘bonus’ obstacle. If a ‘bonus’ obstacle is used, the finish line will be placed directly after the last ‘bonus’ obstacle and the dog will only be required to successfully complete the first four obstacles in the gamble before the second whistle/horn is sounded to denote the end of the allowed gamble time. The handler shall guide the dog to perform the ‘bonus’ obstacle to stop the dog’s course time. If the ‘bonus’ obstacle is not performed to stop the clock, then the dog’s time will stop when the handler places the leash on the dog.

Comments/Rationale: The majority of judges (almost 90%) use the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 for the gamble obstacles for labeling on the course maps and numbering the course. The others use 2, 4, 6, 8. Some competitors have voiced confusion with the different numbering schemes. This motion standardizes the labeling and numbering to what the majority of judges currently use.

Affected: Judges, Course Reviewers, Competitors.

Effective Date: June 1, 2023.

Kalla Jaco

Executive Secretary, Australian Shepherd Club of America

asca.execsec@gmail.com

6091 E. State Hwy 21, Bryan, TX 77808 | (979) 778-1082

Check us out on our Website, Facebook, and YouTube Channel

BOD Motion Results - AG.23.03 Remove Outdated Number of Weaves

Members,

The voting results for this motion have been finalized. Please find them included in this email.

Thank you for your involvement with ASCA.

Sincerely,
Kalla Jaco
ASCA Executive Secretary

AG.23.03 Remove Outdated Number of Weaves

Motion carried (9-0) – Approved: Busquets, Byrne, Creelman, Gann, Gerken, Larson, McCabe, Sims, Wesen. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-voting: None.

Motion by Liaison Byrne to approve the following recommendation from the Agility Committee.

Committee Recommendation: Remove Outdated Number of Weaves

Motion by Jan Niblock to approve this motion because we no longer use 5 or 10 weaves. Seconded by Sandra Katzen.

Results of Committee Vote: Approved: 10. Disapproved: 1. Abstained: None. Non-Voting: None.

Comment/Dissent from Committee Member:

Current Wording:

2.2 Agility Obstacles

All obstacles must meet the specifications listed in Appendix A. Clubs have the option of using slatted or slat-less contact equipment and will specify in the trial premium the type of contact equipment to be used at the trial. Slat-less contact equipment and displaceable tires are preferred.

The following obstacles are required at an ASCA Agility Trial: The following obstacles are optional for an ASCA Agility Trial:

1. A-Frame

2. Dog Walk

3. Teeter-Totter

4. Tunnel

5. Weave Poles (5-6 for Novice, 10-12 for Open & Elite)

6. Jumps (16 minimum, non-winged or winged)

1. Double Bar Jump

2. Tire Jump

5.4.2 Novice Level Course Design

At the Novice level the goal is to test the dog’s ability to perform the obstacles safely. The dog shall be asked to execute the obstacles at a moderate rate of speed. The course for the Novice level should also follow these guidelines:

  1. The course shall consist of 14-16 obstacles.
  2. The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 40’-50’ (12.2 m-15.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.
  3. The line of weave poles used shall consist of 5-6 poles.

5.4.3 Open Level Course Design

At the Open Level, the goal is to test the handler’s and dog’s ability to perform the obstacles at a faster rate of speed, while performing the obstacles with more directional and distance control and exhibit obstacle discrimination. The course design should encourage handlers to work the dog from both sides comfortably. The course for the Open Level shall also follow these guidelines:

  1. The course shall consist of 16-18 obstacles.
  2. The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 30-40’ (9.1 m-12.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.
  3. There shall be ten-twelve weave poles on the course, which could be comprised of one long set of ten-twelve poles or two short sets of five-six poles.

5.4.4 Elite Level Course Design

At the Elite Level, more complex handler strategies are tested, with the dog moving at a brisk pace. The dog should work on both sides of the handler, be able to discriminate between obstacles and freely move away from the handler while performing the obstacles with greater distance and directional control. The course for the Elite level shall also follow these guidelines:

  1. The course shall consist of 18-20 obstacles.
  2. The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 30-40’ (9.1 m-12.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.
  3. There shall be a line of weave poles consisting of ten-twelve poles. An additional set of five-six poles is optional.

7.3.1 Course Obstacles during Initial Point Accumulation Time

The point value for the obstacles during the initial point accumulation time shall be as follows:

Jumps 1 point
Tire Jump, Tunnels 3 points
5-6 Weave Poles 3 points
A-Frame, Dog Walk, Teeter-Totter 5 points
10-12 Weave Poles 5 points

The following lists the minimum of each type of obstacle on any course:

A-Frame 1 Weave Pole Lines: short (5-6) 1-3
Teeter-Totter 1 Jumps 7
Dog Walk 1 Weave Pole Lines: long (10-12) Optional
Tunnels 1 Tire Jump Optional

NOTE: At least one set of weaves is required on each gamblers course. A long set may be used for Open and Elite, but a short set must be used for Novice.

7.3.2 Course Obstacles Allowed in the Gamble Sequence

The following list indicates the gamble obstacles which are acceptable for the different levels:

Novice* Jumps, Tunnels, A-Frame, Teeter-Totter, short set of Weave Poles (5-6)
Open Jumps, Tunnels, A-Frame, Teeter-Totter, short set of Weave Poles (5-6)
Elite Jumps, Tunnels, A-Frame, Teeter-Totter, short or long set of weave poles (5-12)

*See distance restrictions for use of Teeter-Totter and Weave Poles in Novice.

At all levels the last Gamble obstacle, including any bonus obstacles, if used, will be a jump or open tunnel.

Proposed Wording:

2.2 Agility Obstacles

All obstacles must meet the specifications listed in Appendix A. Clubs have the option of using slatted or slat-less contact equipment and will specify in the trial premium the type of contact equipment to be used at the trial. Slat-less contact equipment and displaceable tires are preferred.

The following obstacles are required at an ASCA Agility Trial: The following obstacles are optional for an ASCA Agility Trial:

1. A-Frame

2. Dog Walk

3. Teeter-Totter

4. Tunnel

5. Weave Poles (5-6 for Novice, 10-12 for Open & Elite)

6. Jumps (16 minimum, non-winged or winged)

1. Double Bar Jump

2. Tire Jump

5.4.2 Novice Level Course Design

At the Novice level the goal is to test the dog’s ability to perform the obstacles safely. The dog shall be asked to execute the obstacles at a moderate rate of speed. The course for the Novice level should also follow these guidelines:

  1. The course shall consist of 14-16 obstacles.
  2. The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 40’-50’ (12.2 m-15.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.
  3. The line of weave poles used shall consist of 5-6 poles.

5.4.3 Open Level Course Design

At the Open Level, the goal is to test the handler’s and dog’s ability to perform the obstacles at a faster rate of speed, while performing the obstacles with more directional and distance control and exhibit obstacle discrimination. The course design should encourage handlers to work the dog from both sides comfortably. The course for the Open Level shall also follow these guidelines:

  1. The course shall consist of 16-18 obstacles.
  2. The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 30-40’ (9.1 m-12.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.
  3. There shall be ten-twelve weave poles on the course, which could be comprised of one long set of ten-twelve poles or two short sets of five-six poles.

5.4.4 Elite Level Course Design

At the Elite Level, more complex handler strategies are tested, with the dog moving at a brisk pace. The dog should work on both sides of the handler, be able to discriminate between obstacles and freely move away from the handler while performing the obstacles with greater distance and directional control. The course for the Elite level shall also follow these guidelines:

  1. The course shall consist of 18-20 obstacles.
  2. The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 30-40’ (9.1 m-12.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.
  3. There shall be a line of weave poles consisting of ten-twelve poles. An additional set of five-six poles is optional.

7.3.1 Course Obstacles during Initial Point Accumulation Time

The point value for the obstacles during the initial point accumulation time shall be as follows:

Jumps 1 point
Tire Jump, Tunnels 3 points
5-6 Weave Poles 3 points
A-Frame, Dog Walk, Teeter-Totter 5 points
10-12 Weave Poles 5 points

The following lists the minimum of each type of obstacle on any course:

A-Frame 1 Weave Pole Lines: short (5-6) 1-3
Teeter-Totter 1 Jumps 7
Dog Walk 1 Weave Pole Lines: long (10-12) Optional
Tunnels 1 Tire Jump Optional

NOTE: At least one set of weaves is required on each gamblers course. A long set may be used for Open and Elite, but a short set must be used for Novice.

7.3.2 Course Obstacles Allowed in the Gamble Sequence

The following list indicates the gamble obstacles which are acceptable for the different levels:

Novice* Jumps, Tunnels, A-Frame, Teeter-Totter, short set of Weave Poles (5-6)
Open Jumps, Tunnels, A-Frame, Teeter-Totter, short set of Weave Poles (5-6)
Elite Jumps, Tunnels, A-Frame, Teeter-Totter, short or long set of weave poles (5 6-12)

*See distance restrictions for use of Teeter-Totter and Weave Poles in Novice.

At all levels the last Gamble obstacle, including any bonus obstacles, if used, will be a jump or open tunnel.

Comments/Rationale: The use of 5 or 10 weaves is outdated and the weave pole bases are set up for 6 or 12 weaves. Therefore, it would be a safety hazard to only have 5 or 10 weaves on bases with spike to accommodate 6 or 12 poles. Since they are not used any longer, it makes sense to remove them from the rule book and be consistent with the number of weaves that are actually used.

Affected: Judges and Clubs.

Effective Date: June 1, 2023.

Kalla Jaco

Executive Secretary, Australian Shepherd Club of America

asca.execsec@gmail.com

6091 E. State Hwy 21, Bryan, TX 77808 | (979) 778-1082

Check us out on our Website, Facebook, and YouTube Channel

BOD Motion Results - AG.23.04 Clarifying the Start Line

Members,

The voting results for this motion have been finalized. Please find them included in this email.

Thank you for your involvement with ASCA.

Sincerely,
Kalla Jaco
ASCA Executive Secretary

AG.23.04 Clarifying the Start Line

Motion carried (8-0) – Approved: Busquets, Byrne, Creelman, Gann, Gerken, Larson, McCabe, Wesen. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-voting: Sims.

Motion by Liaison Byrne to approve the following recommendation from the Agility Committee.

Committee Recommendation: Clarifying the Start Line

Motion by Jan Niblock to approve this motion because it will clarify where a dog can start and clarify that a sling shot start that begins past the start is not legal. Seconded by Donalee McElrath.

Results of Committee Vote: Approved: 7. Disapproved: 4. Abstained: None. Non-Voting: None.

Dissent from Committee Member Nicole Watts: I agree the rulebook needs clarifying, but do not agree with the requirement that the dog be forced to start behind an imaginary start line (so I do not agree with the start line rule as currently worded; I understand that my “no” vote is indicative of this). One reason is how often start jumps are crowded very close into a corner, with very little room to line the dog up (if it is on a start line) or send them (if no start line). I think flexibility is called for, here. Said as someone who regularly does “sling shots” in all venues with one of my dogs, but almost never past the plane of the first obstacle, since backside start jumps don’t work very well for me anyway.

But, in general, I just believe the time should start when the dog takes the first obstacle, and that what happens before that is not very important. There are many disadvantages to not having a start line, and I don’t believe it is necessary to make things more difficult for those teams. I will also note, in some response to Pamela B-M’s comments about “just train a start line,” that some of us have worked valiantly for start lines with particular dogs, with no good results. Sometimes there are dogs that just really do not want to stay, even if their criteria is great on other things. Or there are dogs that shut down if left on a start.

Also, a concern re: the stated rationale, if a straight tunnel is #1, starting the dog past the plane of the correct tunnel entrance and sending it back to a correct tunnel entrance is not a backside. So I don’t see any contradiction there with ASCA’s “flow” rules. And a start tunnel is a very common start for jumpers courses, especially.

Current Wording:

Section 5.6 Determining Course Time

5.6.1 Determining a Dog’s Course Time

In the Regular class, a dog’s course time shall be determined using electronic ‘eye’ timing or by using a stopwatch. The time should begin when any part of the dog crosses the start line. The time for the course shall end when any part of the dog completes the final obstacle and crosses the finish line. A dog’s course time shall be recorded by the timekeeper for every run.

6.5.1 Determining a Dog’s Course Time

In the Jumpers class, a dog’s time for running the course shall be determined using electronic ‘eye’ timing or by using a stopwatch. The time should begin when any part of the dog crosses the start line. The time for the course shall end when any part of the dog completes the final obstacle and crosses the finish line. A dog’s course time shall be recorded by the timekeeper for every run.

Section 7.6 Determining Course Time

7.6.1 Determining a Dog’s Recorded Course Time

In the Gamblers class the dog’s time shall be determined by using electronic ‘eye’ timing or by using a stopwatch. The ‘opening sequence’ time should begin when any part of the dog crosses the start line. The plane of the start line shall be clearly marked for the timer and handler.

The time for the course shall end when any part of the dog crosses the finish line after attempting/performing the ‘closing gamble sequence’. The finish line shall be placed as close to the last obstacle (jump or tunnel) in the closing sequence.

Section 9.3 Start and Finish Lines

9.3.1 Purpose of Start and Finish Lines

For all classes, the start and finish lines shall not be considered ‘obstacles’ as part of the course, but merely a way to determine how long it takes a dog to complete the obstacles that comprise the course. In all classes, a dog’s time for running the course shall be determined using electronic ‘eye’ timing or by using a stopwatch. The time should begin when any part of the dog crosses the start line. The time for the course shall end AFTER the dog completes the last obstacle and THEN any part of the dog crosses the finish line.

9.3.2 Bypassing First and Last Obstacles

If the dog crosses the start line but bypasses the first obstacle, time will begin. However, if the dog bypasses the last obstacle, time shall not end until he completes the last obstacle and then crosses the finish line. If the dog never completes the last obstacle, he shall receive a 20-point fault (for failure to compete) and the dog’s course time will end when the handler places the leash on the dog.

Proposed Wording:

Section 5.6 Determining Course Time

5.6.1 Determining a Dog’s Course Time

In the Regular class, a dog’s course time shall will be determined using electronic ‘eye’ timing or by using a stopwatch. The time should will begin when any part of the dog crosses the start line. The time for the course shall will end when any part of the dog completes the final obstacle and crosses the finish line. A dog’s course time shall will be recorded by the timekeeper for every run.

6.5.1 Determining a Dog’s Course Time

In the Jumpers class, a dog’s time for running the course shall will be determined using electronic ‘eye’ timing or by using a stopwatch. The time should will begin when any part of the dog crosses the start line. The time for the course shall will end when any part of the dog completes the final obstacle and crosses the finish line. A dog’s course time shall will be recorded by the timekeeper for every run.

Section 7.6 Determining Course Time

7.6.1 Determining a Dog’s Recorded Course Time

In the Gamblers class the dog’s time shall will be determined by using electronic ‘eye’ timing or by using a stopwatch. The ‘opening sequence’ time should will begin when any part of the dog crosses the start line. The plane of the start line shall will be clearly marked for the timer and handler.

The time for the course shall will end when any part of the dog crosses the finish line after attempting/performing the ‘closing gamble sequence’. The finish line shall will be placed as close to the last obstacle (jump or tunnel) in the closing sequence.

Section 9.3 Start and Finish Lines

9.3.1 Purpose of Start and Finish Lines

For all classes, the start and finish lines shall will not be considered ‘obstacles’ as part of the course, but merely a way to determine how long it takes a dog to complete the obstacles that comprise the course. In all classes, a dog’s time for running the course shall will be determined using electronic ‘eye’ timing or by using a stopwatch. The dog must start behind the plane of the entrance of the first obstacle. The time should will begin when any part of the dog crosses the start line. The time for the course shall will end AFTER the dog completes the last obstacle and THEN any part of the dog crosses the finish line.

9.3.2 Bypassing First and Last Obstacles

If the dog crosses the start line but bypasses the first obstacle, time will begin. However, if the dog bypasses the last obstacle, time shall will not end until he completes the last obstacle and then crosses the finish line. If the dog never completes the last obstacle, he shall will receive a 20-point fault (for failure to compete) and the dog’s course time will end when the handler places the leash on the dog.

Comments/Rationale: It is not clear that the dog cannot start past the plane of the entrance of the first obstacle which was brought up in the discussion about sling shot starts. The ability to set the dog up inside of the start line and send it to the first obstacle is not allowed in the rules but there are some who interrupt it as allowable. Also doing a sling shot past the start line will be a back side which is not allowable in ASCA. This motion will clarify both in the rules.

Affected: Agility Judges, Timers, and Handlers.

Effective Date: June 1, 2023.

Kalla Jaco

Executive Secretary, Australian Shepherd Club of America

asca.execsec@gmail.com

6091 E. State Hwy 21, Bryan, TX 77808 | (979) 778-1082

Check us out on our Website, Facebook, and YouTube Channel

BOD Motion Results - CO.23.01 Awarding 3-Point Major to Reserve Winners Dog/Bitch at National Specialty

Members,

The voting results for this motion have been finalized. Please find them included in this email.

Thank you for your involvement with ASCA.

Sincerely,
Kalla Jaco
ASCA Executive Secretary

CO.23.01 Awarding 3-Point Major to Reserve Winners Dog/Bitch at National Specialty

Motion carried (8-0) – Approved: Busquets, Byrne, Creelman, Gann, Gerken, Larson, McCabe, Wesen. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-voting: Sims.

Motion by Liaison Creelman to approve the following recommendation from the Conformation Committee.

Committee Recommendation: 3-point major awarded to Reserve Winners Dog/Bitch at National Specialty

Motion by Elizabeth Stibley to approve the following changes to Section 12.1 and Section 12.3 of the ASCA Conformation Rulebook. Seconded by Jeff Rusho.

Results of Committee Vote: Approved: 12. Disapproved: 2. Abstained: None. Non-Voting: None.

Dissent from Committee Member Ann DeChant: I am opposed to awarding a major for a Reserve win at Nationals. I would not be opposed to 1 or 2 points. I feel that the win is worthy of points, but a major is too much. This could be one-third of the majors needed to finish a Championship. I feel that Championship titles should be earned by all 3 majors earned in wins that don’t include a major from a Reserve. I feel if we are going to do that, we need rules to ensure that no Championship can be earned with more than one from a Reserve if a motion like this is passed.

Dissent from Committee Member Mary Hellmeister: I agree with Ann that a three-point major is too much. I can deal with one or two points. If the 3-point major stays in there, then a provision needs to be built in that a dog cannot finish on Reserve wins alone. We had a dog years ago that won seven Reserves before he finally won Winners Dog. So, this dog could have easily finished on Reserves alone. I like the general idea of awarding points for Reserve at big shows. Why not include them right from the start? I see an opportunity here to make the program more attractive to exhibitors and clubs and that helps ASCA as well in receiving more funds in fees. Another thought: Most clubs are on schedule 1 or 2. For this to actually happen at big shows the clubs would need to be at least on schedule three, in my opinion, to have the large number of entries we are thinking of. So, for schedule 3 it would have to be 40 entries; 50 entries for schedule 4 and 60 entries for schedule five, divided by sex. The whole thought process needs to include the European clubs and members who provide up to 15% of ASCA’s income each year.

Current Wording:

Section 12.1 Calculating Points – Intact

Intact Championship points will be recorded for Winners Dog and Winners Bitch according to the number of eligible dogs competing in the regular classes of each sex, and according to the Schedule of Points established by the Board of Directors. In counting the number of eligible dogs in competition, a dog that is disqualified, or that is dismissed, excused, or ordered from the ring by the judge or from which all awards are withheld, shall not be included except as noted in these rules and regulations.

Section 12.3 Calculating Points – Altered

Altered Championship points will be recorded for the Winners Dog and Winners Bitch. According to the number of eligible dogs competing in the regular classes of each sex, and according to the Schedule of Points established by the Board of Directors. In counting the number of eligible dogs in Competition, a dog that is disqualified, or that is dismissed, excused, or ordered from the ring by the judge or from which all awards are withheld, shall not be included except as noted in these rules and regulations.

Proposed Wording:

Section 12.1 Calculating Points – Intact

Intact Championship points will be recorded for Winners Dog and Winners Bitch according to the number of eligible dogs competing in the regular classes of each sex, and according to the Schedule of Points established by the Board of Directors. In counting the number of eligible dogs in competition, a dog that is disqualified, or that is dismissed, excused, or ordered from the ring by the judge or from which all awards are withheld, shall not be included except as noted in these rules and regulations.

At the National Specialty the dog designated Reserve Winners Dog and the bitch designated Reserve Winners Bitch will be awarded a three-point major, provided that the number of dogs competing in the regular classes of the Reserve Winner’s sex totals at least twice the number required for a five-point major, according to the Schedule of Points established by the Board of Directors. No major for Reserve Winners shall be given based upon an award of Best of Winners. In counting the number of eligible dogs in competition, a dog that is disqualified, or that is dismissed, excused, or ordered from the ring by the judge or from which all awards are withheld, shall not be included except as noted in these rules and regulations.

Section 12.3 Calculating Points – Altered

Altered Championship points will be recorded for the Winners Dog and Winners Bitch. According to the number of eligible dogs competing in the regular classes of each sex, and according to the Schedule of Points established by the Board of Directors. In counting the number of eligible dogs in Competition, a dog that is disqualified, or that is dismissed, excused, or ordered from the ring by the judge or from which all awards are withheld, shall not be included except as noted in these rules and regulations.

At the National Specialty the dog designated Reserve Winners Dog and the bitch designated Reserve Winners Bitch will be awarded a three-point major, provided that the number of dogs competing in the regular classes of the Reserve Winner’s sex totals at least twice the number required for a five-point major, according to the Schedule of Points established by the Board of Directors. No major for Reserve Winners shall be given based upon an award of Best of Winners. In counting the number of eligible dogs in competition, a dog that is disqualified, or that is dismissed, excused, or ordered from the ring by the judge or from which all awards are withheld, shall not be included except as noted in these rules and regulations.

Comments/Rationale: The National Specialty is the breed’s most prestigious show of the year, with many exhibitors traveling great distances to attend. As such, the National Specialty entry is often 3-5 times greater than local affiliate shows. Awarding points to the Reserve winners at the National Specialty is acknowledging that these winners are defeating (at a minimum) double the number of dogs required to obtain a 5-point major at a local affiliate show. It also recognizes and honors the prestige of the National Specialty.

Affected: Intact Class Dogs/Bitches entered at the National Specialty; Altered Class Dogs/Bitches entered at the National Specialty. ASCA Business Office (The Office Manager confirmed he is okay with the motion, and it will not require programming).

Effective Date: June 1, 2023.

Kalla Jaco

Executive Secretary, Australian Shepherd Club of America

asca.execsec@gmail.com

6091 E. State Hwy 21, Bryan, TX 77808 | (979) 778-1082

Check us out on our Website, Facebook, and YouTube Channel

BOD Motion Results - CO.23.02 Clarification of Section 7.4 Owned or Co-Owned Dogs (Corrected 1/13)

Members,

The voting results for this motion have been finalized. Please find them included in this email.

Thank you for your involvement with ASCA.

Sincerely,
Kalla Jaco
ASCA Executive Secretary

CO.23.02 Clarification of Section 7.4 Owned or Co-Owned Dogs (Corrected 1/13)

Motion carried (7-0) – Approved: Busquets, Byrne, Creelman, Gann, Larson, McCabe, Wesen. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-voting: Gerken, Sims.

Motion by Liaison Creelman to approve the following recommendation from the Conformation Committee.

Committee Recommendation: Motion by Gail Karamalegos to approve the following changes to Section 7.4 of the Conformation Rule Book. Seconded by Brandy Greenhagen.

Results of Committee Vote: Approved: 14. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-Voting: None.

Current Wording:

Section 7.4 Owned or Co-Owned Dogs

No dog owned, co-owned, bred, or co-bred by an officiating Conformation judge can compete in the same Conformation event that he or she is judging. An exception will be made for a show at which multiple judges are judging. Dogs owned or co-owned by a judge may not be shown at that show, but dogs bred or co-bred by a judge may be shown, as long as they are not shown under the judge who bred or co-bred them.

Dogs owned, co-owned, bred, or co-bred by an officiating judge may be shown in Junior Showmanship as long as the judge is not judging Junior Showmanship. In no case will a junior show a dog to a judge who is an owner or co-owner, breeder, or co-breeder of the dog.

Proposed Wording:

  1. No dog owned, co-owned, bred, or co-bred by an officiating Conformation judge can compete in the same Conformation event that he or she is judging. An exception will be made for a show at which multiple judges are judging. Dogs owned or co-owned by a judge may not be shown at that show, but dogs bred or co-bred by a judge may be shown, as long as they are not shown under the judge who bred or co-bred them.
  2. At a show at which multiple judges are judging, such as the National Specialty and associated pre/post Conformation shows, dogs owned or co-owned by a judge who is officiating at that show may not be shown at that show, but. Dogs bred or co-bred by a judge who is officiating at that show may be shown, as long as they are not shown under the judge who bred or co-bred them, and they are not shown in a class in which they would potentially be shown to end up under the judge who bred or co-bred them. An example of that scenario would be Winners Dog/Bitch being shown in Best of Breed.
  3. Dogs owned, co-owned, bred, or co-bred by an officiating judge may be shown in Junior Showmanship as long as the judge is not judging Junior Showmanship. In no case will a junior show a dog to a judge who is an owner or co-owner, breeder, or co-breeder of the dog.

Comments/Rationale: Many judges have been misinterpreting this rule, and in speaking with them, it has been clear that they had assumed that their owned/co-owned dogs were allowed to be shown, as long as it was under another judge at the same event. The proposed wording is a clarification only, and does not change the rule, nor does it impact the Business Office or the computer programming.

Affected: Judges.

Effective Date: June 1, 2023.

Kalla Jaco

Executive Secretary, Australian Shepherd Club of America

asca.execsec@gmail.com

6091 E. State Hwy 21, Bryan, TX 77808 | (979) 778-1082

Check us out on our Website, Facebook, and YouTube Channel

No Current Motions

No Current Motions

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BOD Motion Results - OB.23.01 Revise Point Deduction on Novice and Beginner Novice Fronts for Recalls

Members,

The voting results for this motion have been finalized. Please find them included in this email.

Thank you for your involvement with ASCA.

Sincerely,
Kalla Jaco
ASCA Executive Secretary

OB.23.01 Revise Point Deduction on Novice and Beginner Novice Fronts for Recalls

Motion carried (7-0) – Approved: Busquets, Byrne, Creelman, Gann, Larson, McCabe, Wesen. Disapproved: None. Abstained: None. Non-voting: Gerken, Sims.

Motion by Liaison Busquets to approve the following recommendation from the Obedience Committee.

Committee Recommendation: Revise Point Deduction on Novice and Beginner Novice Fronts for Recalls

Motion by Hilary Hines to include touching the handler on Beginner Novice and Novice recalls as a minor to a substantial deduction. Seconded by Betsy Coleman.

Results of Committee Vote: Approved: 8. Disapproved: 2. Abstained: None. Non-Voting: None.

Current Wording:

Novice

Section 3.12 Recall, Scoring

A dog must receive a score of non-qualifying (NQ) for the following: not Staying without additional command or signal, failure to “Come” on the first command or signal, moving from the place where left before being called or signaled, not sitting close enough so that the handler could readily touch its head without stretching or moving either foot. Substantial deductions shall be made for a slow response to the Come, varying with the extent of the slowness; failure of the dog to come at a brisk trot or gallop; for the dog’s standing or lying down instead of waiting in the Sit position; for failure to Sit in Front; failure to Finish or Sit at Heel; or for an extra command or signal to Sit or Finish. Minor to substantial deductions shall be made depending on the specific circumstances in each case for failure to come directly in to the handler. Minor deductions shall be made for slow or poor “Sits” or for “Finishes” which are not prompt or smart, for touching the handler on coming in or while finishing, and for sitting between the handler’s feet.

Beginner Novice

Section 8.15 Recall, Scoring

A dog must receive a score of non-qualifying (NQ) for the following: not staying without additional command or signal, moving from the place where left before being called or signaled, not coming to the handler, coming to the handler after more than two commands and/or signals to come, or not coming close enough so that the handler could readily touch its head without stretching or moving either foot. Minor or substantial deductions will be made for the handler’s extra command or signal to come or to sit, for the dog’s failure to come at a brisk trot or gallop, or for the dog’s failure to sit. Minor deductions will be made for slow or poor sits.

Proposed Wording:

Novice

Section 3.12 Recall, Scoring

A dog must receive a score of non-qualifying (NQ) for the following: not Staying without additional command or signal, failure to “Come” on the first command or signal, moving from the place where left before being called or signaled, not sitting close enough so that the handler could readily touch its head without stretching or moving either foot. Substantial deductions shall be made for a slow response to the Come, varying with the extent of the slowness; failure of the dog to come at a brisk trot or gallop; for the dog’s standing or lying down instead of waiting in the Sit position; for failure to Sit in Front; failure to Finish or Sit at Heel; or for an extra command or signal to Sit or Finish. Minor to substantial deductions shall be made depending on the specific circumstances in each case for failure to come directly in to the handler or touching the handler. Minor deductions shall be made for slow or poor “Sits” or for “Finishes” which are not prompt or smart, for touching the handler on coming in or while finishing, and for sitting between the handler’s feet.

Beginner Novice

Section 8.15 Recall, Scoring

A dog must receive a score of non-qualifying (NQ) for the following: not staying without additional command or signal, moving from the place where left before being called or signaled, not coming to the handler, coming to the handler after more than two commands and/or signals to come, or not coming close enough so that the handler could readily touch its head without stretching or moving either foot. Minor or substantial deductions will be made for the handler’s extra command or signal to come or to sit, for the dog’s failure to come at a brisk trot or gallop, for the dog touching the handler, or for the dog’s failure to sit. Minor deductions will be made for slow or poor sits.

Comments/Rationale: Currently there is no point deduction listed in Beginner Novice for touching the handler on the recall, and only minor point deductions for the Novice recall. When a dog slams forcefully into the handler on the recall, judges should be able to deduct substantial points. This motion will allow judges more flexibility in scoring.

Affected: Judges. Obedience Exhibitors. ASCA Business Office and Webmaster will not be affected. Program Software Vendors will not be affected.

Effective Date: June 1, 2023.

Kalla Jaco

Executive Secretary, Australian Shepherd Club of America

asca.execsec@gmail.com

6091 E. State Hwy 21, Bryan, TX 77808 | (979) 778-1082

Check us out on our Website, Facebook, and YouTube Channel

No Current Motions

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